Client:  DOT, Eagle River Community

Visioning exercise defining a sense of place for Eagle River.  Through this process opportunities for surfaces, dimensions and locations of trails and sidewalks evolved as part of the realignment project. The visioning defined connections to existing recreational, institutional and educational facilities, providing design guidelines and elements appropriate for specific roadway sections to reflect the local character, compliance with DOT design regulations and recommendations for mitigating environmental impact from construction. As part of the design process, organization and interaction with the public and special interest groups were used to guide the design process. Meetings with the steering group, public presentations and workshops allowed the community to define the local character. Information was collected through a series of public meetings, written responses and other dialog. Safety issues addressed recommendations for pedestrian lighting, winter cities conditions (short day length, snow, cold temperatures, wind, etc.) and bus shelters at bus stops for children and public transit. Plantings were chosen to deter moose browsing to limit conflicts with other wildlife. These plantings also had to meet standards that would survive severe road and climatic conditions.

Eagle River Loop Road Realignment, Eagle River, Alaska.

Lead landscape architect providing design services for surfaces, dimensions and locations of trails and sidewalks as part of the realignment project. Responsibilities included defining connections to existing recreational, institutional and educational facilities, providing design guidelines and elements appropriate for specific roadway sections to reflect the local character, compliance with DOT design regulations and recommendations for mitigating environmental impact from construction. As part of the design process, organization and interaction with the public and special interest groups were used to guide the design process. Meetings with the steering group, public presentations and workshops allowed the community to define the local character. Information was collected through a series of public meetings, written responses and other dialog. Safety issues addressed recommendations for pedestrian lighting, winter cities conditions (short day length, snow, cold temperatures, wind, etc.) and bus shelters at bus stops for children and public transit. Plantings were chosen to deter moose browsing to limit conflicts with other wildlife. These plantings also had to meet standards that would survive severe road and climatic conditions.

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